Party time

The first time Audrey was invited to a birthday party (by a child who’s parents we didn’t know – a nursery friend), it was a real example of how she was accepted and liked by her “typical” peers. It was a big deal.

When we went to the party, we all had a good time overall but Audrey did show signs of being “different”. She wouldn’t eat (and the food on offer was the stuff of dreams: crisps, blueberries, chocolate cake, sausages…) and she asked to go home. She wasn’t crying, distressed or upset, she was just… uncomfortable.

We had a couple of other party invites and basically decided it was important to always get out of her comfort zone and see how she got on (rather than say no and miss out through fear). Again, we saw Audrey not eating (despite the selection of food being perfect), asking to go home or complaining it was too loud, but we never let it stop us trying, because she often enjoyed a little dance and she always left happy.

And then it happened- she ate at a noisy party. She joined in. She didn’t complain. We had a great time.

Now both our kids live for parties! (Because they love music, presents and cake).

So we were pumped last weekend to be offered a chance to go to Big Fish Little Fish at Stanmer Park for a – wait for it – family drum n bass/jungle afternoon rave. As we set off to drive up the road we realised that (yet again), we had left the kids’ ear defenders. We have them for events just like this and we literally never remember to take them, so the kids just have to make do and deal with the noise.

We arrived on a very sunny day to the amazing marquee of bubbles and play tunnels and a very loud sound system and I admit, I was a little worried. But Audrey (and Rex) bossed it. They came in, ran about exploring and got stuck in. Audrey showed a wobble initially when she had no interest in having some apple juice (funny this is a measure of how uncomfortable she is, but it is!), once she had settled she took a sip and I knew we were ok.

She showed enthusiasm for the face painter, again, something I shamefully would associate as something she “might not like because she has special needs”, but I knew she had dabbled a little at nursery and she seemed keen, so we queued up. When I sat her in the chair, the face painter asked me if Audrey had had her face painted before and she was just very considerate and gentle with her. Audrey was a really good girl and the face painter was so fast that before I knew it, I was looking at the most beautiful tiger in the world!

Aside from dancing, drinking juice, climbing through tunnels and rolling out play dough, there was also the fabulous outdoor space filled with “rustic” climbing frames and slides for the kids.

Audrey was unsuitably dressed for this in her fabulous Tootsa McGinty dress and Next tiger wellies, but oh how she surprised me with some supreme climbing! Rexy too (but it’s extra tough for Audrey with her low muscle tone).

As someone who regularly sticks to routine, taking the kids to the same groups/parks/cafes that I know “work” for us, it seems a little crazy to be saying this, but it’s good to step out of your comfort zone sometimes. Kids love routine and it can be hugely stressful if you do something new and they hate it or misbehave, but you’ll never know unless you try.

Last Sunday we went to see my Nan (the kids’ Great Grandma), which I thought would probably be stressful/chaos, but was actually great. She has just been moved to an old people’s home and she is almost 99 – Audrey’s middle name is Emily, after this nan. Emily lit up seeing Audrey and Rex, but so did all the other old people in the home, they looked so happy to have children running around, it was great. The kids loved the piano there (and made quite a bit of noise, but no one minded).

That same day, we were going to the seaside, the kids were excited (because, despite living by the sea we rarely go down there). I thought that would be a really fun activity, but instead, the sun disappeared as soon as we pulled up (literally, a weird sea fog arrived and the temperature dropped). We got down onto the sand and Audrey’s nose was running, the cold wind was blowing and no one was having any fun, we were all shivering. But at least we tried!

Next week are trying a new dance class at the marina. Watch this space!!

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(Belated) World Down’s Syndrome Day 2018

I always think this day comes around so quickly and that here I am again (eye roll) talking about World Down’s Syndrome Day… but then I realise that every day is #WDSD for me. So for those of you not regularly “exposed”, let’s learn a few things. Firstly, it’s 21st March and I didn’t finish this post in time (forgive me).

This year I threw myself in a little bit more than usual- we were in a printed magazine!

A piece came out in Take a Break:

This came about from The Specials “If I could go back…” video we took part in, (writing a letter to myself to talk about what I wish I had known when Audrey was born).

I also submitted a list to Mother of All Lists. An honest “Instamum” I am a fan of. I actually found it quite hard to write as I found myself getting quite ‘ranty’ (aka passionate?) when talking about DS. However once it was out there I had such a fantastic response, I was really pleased to have done it. It’s scary exposing your personal story (especially one that touches on Down’s syndrome screening and abortion), but it was a great way to reach an audience of mums who might otherwise have no knowledge of where society is with screening for DS or that humans like Audrey exist; being fabulous.

We had a party the weekend ahead of WDSD with Brighton and Hove families. Soft play, a disco, party food, music man, a raffle… great fun but exhausting. At the party a child was using Audrey as a step-up (climbing on her!!) and Rex threw himself in the way saying “That’s Audrey!”. I mean, he would happily climb on her himself, but he will also defend and protect her when needed! So lovely.

Audrey’s next EHCP meeting was looming, school in September seems close and scary. She’s seen an episode of Topsy and Tim and seems to think she’ll get a bike and a helmet to go to school with! She cracks me up. Once we had the meeting however, I felt so much better about it all. The SENCO was lovely and it felt… doable. I could imagine her at a mainstream school and not start to feel sick!

We are doing our monthly table tennis sessions thanks to our local T21 group (Trisomy 21 is the medical name for Down’s Syndrome) and loving it. Naturally the kids don’t really play table tennis, but they have a good runaround in a community space and it’s an inspiring place to be (given that they have 3 coaches with DS there – the only 3 qualified sports coaches in the world with DS!).

I’m always full to the brim with things to say about Audrey, about Down’s Syndrome, although I feel I’ve neglected the blog a little lately (which I’ll try to rectify!), but just know that this little human of ours is doing really well and we #wouldntchangeathing